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Big chicken : the incredible story of how antibiotics created modern agriculture and changed the way the world eats / Maryn McKenna. Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, 2017. 400 pages.

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From Library Journal Reviews:

Health journalist McKenna (Superbug; Beating Back the Devil) recounts the history of chicken production through the dual and interwoven narratives of antibiotic use and the rise of the industrial chicken. In order to accomplish this, the author relies on a number of sources including chemists, lawyers, historians, chefs, farmers, and more, which allows for a complex yet complete exploration of the meat we consume today in ever larger numbers. The author follows a salmonella infection from the patient in the hospital backward to the farm where the bacteria originated. Of particular interest is the discussion of the growth of antibiotics popularity in farm animals and how that in turn affects human resistance to these drugs. McKenna suggests that chicken farming can be safe, offering examples from farms in France, though she notes that we must turn away from the intensive methods of mass production that have been used in this country for decades. VERDICT This book is accessible to nonscientists and will interest anyone curious about food production, as well as those eager to know more about the development of antibiotic resistance in animals and humans.

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We interrupt this program : Indigenous media tactics in Canadian culture / Miranda J. Brady and John M.H. Kelly.
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2017. xiii, 206 pages.

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From Booklist Reviews:

We Interrupt This Program tells the story of how Indigenous people are using media tactics or interventions in art, film, television, and journalism to disrupt Canada’s national narratives and rewrite them from Indigenous perspectives. Accounts of strategically chosen moments such as survivor testimonies at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission combined with conversations with CBC reporter Duncan McCue and artists such as Kent Monkman bring to life Brady and Kelly’s powerful argument that media tactics can be employed to change Canadian institutions from within. As articulations of Indigenous sovereignty, these tactics can also spark new forms of political and cultural expression in Indigenous communities.

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Mothers and others : the role of parenthood in politics / edited by Melanee Thomas and Amanda Bittner.
Vancouver : UBC Press, 2017. xv, 353 pages.

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From Book News:

This volume contains 15 essays by scholars of political science and other fields from North America and the UK, who analyze the role of parental status in political life, focusing on motherhood and how being a parent influences how, why, and to what extent women engage with politics. They consider women with political careers, including their legislative careers and recruitment in Britain, challenges faced by legislators who are or will become mothers with infants while in office, maternalism in Latin American politics, the impact of gender quotas on local boards and committees in Iowa, and the construction of motherhood by leaders of national conservative organizations representing women’s interests. They explore aspects related to citizens, media, and party/candidate strategic communications, including whether legislators present their families and parental status in communications, press coverage of female political candidates, and how parenthood has become politicized, and end with consideration of the effect of parenthood on public opinion and political participation in Canada, the role of parental status in the acquisition of political information, how traditional ideologies about gender roles influence voters’ perceptions of parental leave policies, parental gaps among women due to parental status in political participation, and the increased political activity of parents in Sweden.

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Leading the unleadable : how to manage mavericks, cynics, divas, and other difficult people / Alan Willett. New York : AMACOM, 2017. xiv, 225 pages.

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From Booklist Reviews:

One of the hallmarks of great leadership is mind-set - or, quite simply, the ability to power through problems and issues and work with them as opportunities. Consultant Willett teaches us how as he first defines what constitutes excellent leadership and then goes through to provide diagnoses, actions, and follow-ups to remedy people problems, all with an eye to improvement and success. It's a logical organizational design and learning approach, supported by a few realistic case studies and some very practical advice. A few examples: start with the belief that everyone has good intentions. Accept reality, but do not let it define you. Treat trouble as information-rich data. Every chapter concludes with reflection points, a summary of key concepts for readers with time constraints. And charts scattered throughout aid in decision making, especially for issue-prone questions like firing/retaining an employee. Positive, and appropriate enough for new and seasoned managers to use as a guide to the divas around us.

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As we have always done : indigenous freedom through radical resistance / Leanne Betasamosake Simpson.
Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2017. 312 pages.

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From Book News:

Simpson, a member of the Michi Saagiig Nishinaabeg people, has a very simple wish for her great-grandchildren: indigeneous freedom. Two-hundred years ago her people, known as the salmon people, lived in an idyllic setting “at the mouth of the rivers” (michi saagiig)--surrounded by old-growth white pine forests and sacred places. Then, their land was stolen, and clear-cut, with sacred places eventually disappearing under concrete buildings at provincial tourist parks, their rice beds nearly destroyed by rising water levels from the Trent-Severn Waterway, boat traffic, and sewage from cottages, with the salmon and eels disappearing about a hundred years ago. The Indian Act brought residential schools, sanatoriums, child welfare, and, more recently, an education system that refuses to acknowledge their culture, knowledge, histories, and experiences. It was in this context that Simpson experienced the real urgency of the need for a resurgence. The Nishnaabeg word kobade refers to the link in the chain between generations, nations, states of being, individuals, great-grandparents and great-grandchildren. She cites the miracle of her life: the family chain that did whatever they could to ensure that she survived the past four hundred years of violence. In order for kobade to survive and flourish for the next four hundred years, her people need to join together in love, persistence, commitment, and co-resistance working toward a radical alternative present, which has the potential to create Nishinaabeg futures that categorically refuse and reject dispossession and settler colonialism and the violence of capitalism, hetero-patriarchy, white supremacy, and anti-blackness that maintains them. She cites her vision as a manifesto for those who are not afraid to let radical imagining move themselves out of domination in order to destroy the pillars of settle colonialism.

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Wild weather on the Prairies : from the Calgary Herald, Calgary Sun,  Edmonton Journal, Edmonton Sun, Regina Leader-Post, Saskatoon Starphoenix,  Winnipeg Sun
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Wild weather on the Prairies : from the Calgary Herald, Calgary Sun, Edmonton Journal, Edmonton Sun, Regina Leader-Post, Saskatoon Starphoenix, Winnipeg Sun / by Monica Zurowski with Norma Marr and Karen Crosby. Vancouver : Greystone Books, 2017. 119 pages.

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A photographic record of the weather-dangerous, devastating, and often beautiful-that shapes the Canadian Prairies and the people who live there.

Nothing brings Prairie people together like the weather. It's a common tie and a topic discussed almost daily at water coolers in the region. When weather events rage across Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, there are times when nothing and no one is safe. But something positive rises from the resulting debris, mud, and ashes. Resolve and grit take over and Prairie folk rebuild their communities and lend a helping hand to both neighbors and strangers.

With text written by longtime Calgary Herald editor Monica Zurowski and two hundred striking color photographs pulled from the archives of the Calgary Herald, Calgary Sun, Edmonton Journal, Edmonton Sun, Regina Leader-Post, Saskatoon StarPhoenix, and Winnipeg Sun, this book celebrates the indomitable spirit of Prairie people as they face tornadoes, floods, fires, blizzards, hailstorms, dust storms, and heat waves.

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Seven fallen feathers : racism, death, and hard truths in a northern city / Tanya Talaga.
Toronto : Anansi, 2017. 361 pages.

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From Booklist Reviews:

Talaga, a veteran investigative reporter for the Toronto Star, has crafted an urgent and unshakable portrait of the horrors faced by indigenous teens going to school in Thunder Bay, Ontario, far from their homes and families. Since the early twentieth century, indigenous children living on Native reservations in northwestern Ontario have lacked access to a quality education. A child's best shot at a bright future is to move away from home and attend school in one of the bigger nearby cities, like Thunder Bay. This often means fleeing the nest and living independently at only 13 or 14 years old. Aside from the premature launch, indigenous teenagers face a myriad of hardships while attending big-city high schools—rampant racism, extreme underage alcohol and substance abuse, along with physical and sexual violence. Talaga chronicles seven untimely and largely unsolved deaths that have taken place among Native Thunder Bay students since the new millennium. Seven families lost children too soon, and seven families were denied justice by police, coroners, and school administrators. Talaga's incisive research and breathtaking storytelling could bring this community one step closer to the healing it deserves.

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Maximum Canada : why 35 million Canadians are not enough
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Maximum Canada : why 35 million Canadians are not enough / Doug Saunders.
Toronto : Alfred A. Knopf Canada, 2017. 249 pages.

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From the publisher:

To face the future, Canada needs more Canadians. But why and how many?

Canada’s population has always grown slowly, when it has grown at all. That wasn’t by accident. For centuries before Confederation and a century after, colonial economic policies and an inward-facing world view isolated this country, attracting few of the people and building few of the institutions needed to sustain a sovereign nation. In fact, during most years before 1967, a greater number of people fled Canada than immigrated to it. Canada’s growth has faltered and left us underpopulated ever since.

At Canada’s 150th anniversary, a more open, pluralist and international vision has largely overturned that colonial mindset and become consensus across the country and its major political parties. But that consensus is ever fragile. Our small population continues to hamper our competitive clout, our ability to act independently in an increasingly unstable world, and our capacity to build the resources we need to make our future viable.

In Maximum Canada, a bold and detailed vision for Canada’s future, award-winning author and Globe and Mail columnist Doug Saunders proposes a most audacious way forward: to avoid global obscurity and create lasting prosperity, to build equality and reconciliation of indigenous and regional divides, and to ensure economic and ecological sustainability, Canada needs to triple its population.

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The constitution in a hall of mirrors : Canada at 150
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The constitution in a hall of mirrors : Canada at 150 / David E. Smith.
Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2017. xiv, 197 pages.

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From Publisher:

Whether it’s the first-past-the-post electoral system or partisan government appointees to the Senate, Canadians want better representation and accountability from the federal government. Before reforms can be enacted, however, it is important to explore and clarify the relationships among Canada’s three parliamentary institutions: Crown, Senate, and Commons.

In The Constitution in a Hall of Mirrors, David E. Smith presents a learned but accessible analysis of the interconnectedness of Canada’s parliamentary institutions. Smith argues that Parliament is a unity comprised of three parts and any reforms made to one branch will, whether intended or not, affect the other branches. Through a timely, nuanced, and comprehensive examination of parliamentary debates, committee reports, legal scholarship, and comparative analysis of developments in the United Kingdom, Smith uncovers the substantial degree of ambiguity that exists among Canadians and their calls for structural and operational reforms. By illuminating the symbiotic relationship between the Crown, Senate, and Commons, The Constitution in a Hall of Mirrors brings government reform closer to reality.

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Could it happen here : Canada in the age of Trump and Brexit / Michael Adams.
Toronto : Simon & Schuster, 2017. xi, 178 pages.

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From the publisher:

From award-winning author Michael Adams, Could It Happen Here? draws on groundbreaking new social research to show whether Canadian society is at risk of the populist forces afflicting other parts of the world.

Americans elected Donald Trump. Britons opted to leave the European Union. Far-right, populist politicians channeling anger at out-of-touch “elites” are gaining ground across Europe. In vote after shocking vote, citizens of Western democracies have pushed their anger to the top of their governments’ political agendas. The votes have varied in their particulars, but their unifying feature has been rejection of moderation, incrementalism, and the status quo.

Amid this roiling international scene, Canada appears placid, at least on the surface. As other societies retrench, the international media have taken notice of Canada’s welcome of Syrian refugees, its half-female federal cabinet, and its acceptance of climate science and mixed efforts to limit its emissions. After a year in power, the centrist federal government continues to enjoy majority approval, suggesting an electorate not as bitterly split as the ones to the south or in Europe.

As sceptics point out, however, Brexit and a Trump presidency were unthinkable until they happened. Could it be that Canada is not immune to the same forces of populism, social fracture, and backlash that have afflicted other parts of the world? Our largest and most cosmopolitan city elected Rob Ford. Conservative Party leadership hopeful Kellie Leitch proposes a Canadian values test for immigrants and has called the Trump victory “exciting.” Anti-tax demonstrators in Alberta chanted “lock her up” in reference to Premier Rachel Notley, an elected leader accused of no wrongdoing, only policy positions the protesters disliked.

Pollster and social values researcher Michael Adams takes Canadians into the examining room to see whether we are at risk of coming down with the malaise affecting other Western democracies. Drawing on major social values surveys of Canadians and Americans in 2016 - as well as decades of tracking data in both countries - Adams examines our economy, institutions, and demographics to answer the question: could it happen here?


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