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March 2017 Selected New Titles (PDF)

Librarian's Picks for March 2017:

Cover of Remembered in bronze and stone : Canada’s Great War memorial statuary
Cover of
Remembered in
bronze and stone
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Remembered in bronze and stone : Canada’s Great War memorial statuary / Alan Livingstone MacLeod ; foreword by David Macfarlane. Victoria : Heritage House, 2016. 192 pages.

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From the publisher:

Remembered in Bronze and Stone evokes the years immediately following the First World War, when grief was still freshly felt in communities from one end of Canada to the other. This book tells the story of the nation’s war memorials—particularly bronze or stone sculptures depicting Canadian soldiers—through the artists who conceived them, the communities that built them, and, above all, those who died in the war and were immortalized in these stunning sculptures raised in their honour. A century has passed since Canadians were scarred by the loss of more than sixty thousand sons and daughters, who now lie in faraway battlefield graves. Highlighting more than 130 monuments from coast to coast, Remembered in Bronze and Stone revives a pivotal period in history that changed Canada forever.

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Cover of Celebrating Canada : volume 1: Holidays, national days, and the crafting of identities
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Celebrating
Canada
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Celebrating Canada : volume 1: Holidays, national days, and the crafting of identities / edited by Matthew Hayday and Raymond B. Blake. Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2016. x, 450 pages.

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From the publisher:

Holidays are a key to helping us understand the transformation of national, regional, community and ethnic identities. In Celebrating Canada, Matthew Hayday and Raymond Blake situate Canada in an international context as they examine the history and evolution of our national and provincial holidays and annual celebrations.

The contributors to this volume examine such holidays as Dominion Day, Victoria Day, Quebec’s Fête Nationale and Canadian Thanksgiving, among many others. They also examine how Canadians celebrate the national days of other countries (like the Fourth of July) and how Dominion Day was observed in the United Kingdom. Drawing heavily on primary source research, and theories of nationalism, identities and invented traditions, the essays in this collection deepen our understanding of how these holidays have influenced the evolution of Canadian identities.

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Cover of Reclaiming conversation : the power of talk in a digital age
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Reclaiming
conversation
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Reclaiming conversation : the power of talk in a digital age / Sherry Turkle. New York : Penguin Books, 2016. 436 pages.

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From the Booklist Reviews:

The modern world is one of paradox, writes MIT professor, clinical psychologist, and prominent writer Turkle. Technology has enabled humans to become the most resourceful, resilient, and rewarded beings in history, yet many of us appear to lack the social and linguistic abilities to successfully navigate even the most basic situations. What has been compromised in the digital age is the ability to relate. E-mails, texts, instant messages, and social media have afforded myriad methods by which to connect, but at the expense of the ability to converse. These are ways to share information but not ideals, means of reaching out to but not truly touching someone else. As a result, people are losing the ability to empathize, to talk beyond the most superficial level, to develop deeper understandings of ourselves and our place in the larger world, one that seems to have shrunk to the size of a phone or computer screen. From the kitchen table to the classroom and office, these electronic devices dictate how humans interact. Knowing how and when best to use them can make the difference between meaningful communication and meaningless encounters. There's a wealth of relevant information and revealing insights on every page as Turkle provocatively takes us to the "use it or lose it" communications precipice.

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Cover of Northern lights : exploring Canada’s think tank landscape
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Northern
lights
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Northern lights : exploring Canada’s think tank landscape / Donald E. Abelson. Montreal : McGill-Queens University Press, 2016. xviii, 371 pages.

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From the publisher:

Think tanks are often thought of as a uniquely US phenomenon. Although the largest concentration of think tanks is in the United States, they can be found in virtually every country. Often overlooked, Canada’s think tanks represent a highly diverse and eclectic group of public policy organizations such as the Canadian Centre for Policy Alernatives, the C.D. Howe Institute, the Fraser Institute, and the Mowat Centre among others. In Northern Lights Donald Abelson explores the rise of think tanks in Canada and addresses many of the most commonly asked questions about how, and under what circumstances, they are able to affect public opinion and public policy. He identifies the ways in which Canadian think tanks often prioritize political advocacy over policy research, and seeks to explain why these organizations are well-suited and equipped to shape the discourse around key policy issues.

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Cover of Language at the speed of sight : how we read, why so many can’t, and what can be done about it
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Language at
the speed
of sight
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Language at the speed of sight : how we read, why so many can’t, and what can be done about it / Mark Seidenberg. New York : Basic Books, 2017. 374 pages.

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From Publishers Weekly Reviews:

Cognitive neuroscientist Seidenberg digs deep into the science of reading to reveal the ways human beings learn how to read and process language. After describing how humans adapted to form writing, speech, and languages, Seidenberg explores current research into dyslexia and other literacy problems, especially as they pertain to the challenges facing the American education system. Progress in reading is inexorably tied to achievement gaps and differences in socioeconomic status, but Seidenberg circles back to the biological connections among spoken language, dyslexia, and general reading ability. Poverty alone cannot account for the U.S.'s "mediocre showing" in multinational assessments, he says. His major criticism of national reading progress lies in the "culture of education" or the way teachers are trained to approach teaching. Seidenberg turns against the trend of natural "discovery" learning, where he says nothing is really taught, and argues that direct instruction by tested methods is the best way to ensure students consistently learn to read. Seidenberg's analysis is backed up by numerous studies and tables of data. His approach is pragmatic, myth-destroying, and rooted in science—and his writing makes for powerful reading.

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The Selected New Titles list includes new items in the library collection and is published monthly. These items are available for circulation to Manitoba government personnel through our library catalogue, by email at legislative_library@gov.mb.ca, or by phone at 204-945-4330. They are available to the public through interlibrary loan services at their library.

For more information on the Selected New Titles lists, call 204-945-6384 or email leglibraryservices@gov.mb.ca