Settlement and Other Agreements

The Manitoba government is signatory to numerous settlement agreements relating to the adverse effects of hydroelectric development and self-government agreements. Indigenous and Municipal Relations serves as the provincial lead in the negotiation and implementation of these agreements.

Hydroelectric Related Settlement Agreements

Hydroelectric related settlement agreements are agreements that will, collectively and individually, resolve land and other issues that relate to the effects of hydroelectric development on communities and their residents. These agreements may include provisions for financial compensation, land and cooperative natural resource management between the community and Manitoba.

The Northern Flood Agreement (1997)

The Northern Flood Agreement (1997) (NFA) was developed and signed by the Manitoba government, the Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board, the Government of Canada and the Northern Flood Committee (representing Nelson House Cree Nation, Norway House Cree Nation, Cross Lake First Nation, Split Lake Cree Nation and York Factory First Nation). To assist the signatories in the implementation of the NFA, implementation agreements were negotiated to reach a mutually agreed upon way to implement the NFA. Implementation agreements have been reached with four of the five NFA First Nations.

Grand Rapids Forebay Agreements

The Grand Rapids Forebay Agreements address outstanding matters related to the adverse effects of the Grand Rapids Hydroelectric Project (1960s). These agreements include provisions for financial compensation, land and cooperative natural resource management between the community and Manitoba. Four agreements were developed and signed between the Manitoba government, the Manitoba Hydro-Electric Board and the following four communities:

Other Agreements

Individual agreements have been signed with other First Nations or community councils relating to the adverse effects of hydroelectric development which are not part of Grand Rapids Forebay or Northern Flood Agreements. These communities include:

Resource Management Boards

Through the various above agreements, Resource Management Boards (RMBs) were established to assist in the co-management of natural resources in defined areas (Resource Management Areas). Indigenous and Municipal Relations serves as the provincial lead in the management and implementation of the RMBs established under these agreements.

Self-Government Agreements

Self-government agreements establish arrangements for Aboriginal groups to govern their internal affairs and assume greater responsibility and control over the decision making that affects their communities.

Manitoba is signatory to the Sioux Valley Governance Agreement, alongside the Government of Canada and Sioux Valley Dakota Nation (SVDN). The agreement, signed in 2013, sets out SVDN’s government arrangements and provides for a government-to-government relationship between Canada and SVDN.