Manitoba's Strategic Advantages

The Land


Manitoba, CanadaThe Heart of North America

Midway between the Caribbean Sea and the Arctic Ocean, the Atlantic and Pacific, is a land where southern prairie and northern forest meet, where rolling waves of grain are matched by the waves of vast freshwater seas.

This is Manitoba: the connector between east and west, north and south.

With 650,000 square km (250,000 square miles), Manitoba covers a vast area and includes four distinct geographic regions, each with its own flora, fauna and land features. One sixth of the province’s surface is comprised of more than 100,000 lakes, including Lake Winnipeg, the fifth largest freshwater lake in Canada.

Eastern and northern Manitoba are dominated by the mineral-rich Canadian Shield – a land of forests, scenic lakes and rivers that create vast hydroelectric power resources that are still only one-half tapped. The southern regions of prairie and mixed forest and grassland produce wheat, canola and other grains, vegetables, livestock, poultry and dairy products in abundance.

One sixth of the province’s surface is comprised of more than 100,000 lakes, including Lake Winnipeg, the fifth largest freshwater lake in Canada.

The varied terrain of the province ranges from the rolling hills and escarpments of the Riding, Duck and Turtle Mountains, to the rich alluvial soil of the Red River Valley, to the rugged granite outcroppings of the Canadian Shield.

Like the other Prairie provinces and the northern plains states, Manitoba’s climate is characterized by four distinct seasons, with warm summers and cold winters. In much of southern Manitoba, growing seasons are longer than in the agricultural regions of Alberta and Saskatchewan, with more frost-free days and more growing degree days to encourage plant growth. Winnipeg, the capital city, receives over 330 more hours per year of bright sunshine than Toronto or Montreal, and over 440 more than Vancouver.

Manitoba’s ample resources have attracted people for thousands of years.

For ages, Manitoba was a meeting place between the aboriginal peoples of the forest and the plains. With the arrival of the fur trade in the 1700s, came French-Canadian and Scottish traders and settlers, leading eventually to Manitoba’s birth as a province in 1870 with a population of Francophones, Anglophones, Metis and First Nations. As the entry point to the Canadian West following the completion of the Canadian Pacific Railway in 1885, Manitoba attracted new Canadians from around the world. Today, Manitoba celebrates its rich history and its diversity of cultures and languages.

Today, Manitoba celebrates its rich history and its diversity of cultures and languages.

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