Manitoba
Printer Friendly

Wildlife Branch


Link Chronic Wasting Disease Brochure PDF Document

Link Dépliant Encéphalopathie des cervidés (EC) PDF Document


 

To view PDF files, you must have a copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader which is available as a free download.

Get  Acrobat Reader

Banner

Chronic Wasting Disease Initiatives

What Is Manitoba Conservation Doing To Address Chronic Wasting Disease?

The results of analyzed samples indicates there is no evidence of CWD in Manitoba. All samples tested by Manitoba Conservation have been negative.

Manitoba Big Game Tested For CWD (June, 2005)
Year White-tailed
Deer
Elk Moose Mule Deer Total
Number
Tested
98/99
137
240
133
2
512
99/00
89
225
15
0
329
00/01
95
434
0
0
529
01/02
350
141
0
0
491

02/03

495
134
0
0
615

03/04

675
175
0
0
615
04/05
555
123
0
3
681
Total
2,396
1,472
148
5
4,021

Prevention

A moratorium has been placed on the importation of native and exotic cervids (i.e., all members of the deer family) that pose a risk of spreading CWD.

The possession of scents and other substances that contain urine, faeces, saliva or scent glands of cervids has been banned.

The Manitoba Regulation: MR85/2003 has been amended to read:

"It is illegal to bring into Manitoba a cervid that has been killed in another province or state without first removing the head, hide, hooves, mammary glands, internal organs, and spinal column, and leaving these parts in the place of origin. Antlers and connecting bone plate that has been detached from the remainder of the skull and has had all hide and other tissue removed, may be bought in, provided the bone plate and antler bases are treated with a solution of not less than two percent (2%) chlorine. Raw capes and hides that have been detached from the animals and sealed in a waterproof container that ensures that no fluids, tissue or hair can escape may be brought in provided that they are delivered, within five (5) days of entry, to taxidermist or a licenced facility for chemical processing into a tanned product."

These restrictions apply to all hunters, including First Nations people.
Manitoba Conservation continues to consults with jurisdictions that have the disease regarding research, management activities and control practices. As well, Manitoba Conservation is a founding member of an Inter-Provincial CWD Forum with Ontario, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories, Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Parks Canada.

Results

If a positive wild or captive cervid is found, Manitoba Conservation, in cooperation with Manitoba Agriculture and Food and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency will initiate containment and eradication actions.

What Is Being Done By Other Agencies?

Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Initiatives(MAFRI), in cooperation with Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), has a compulsory CWD surveillance program in place for farmed elk. All captive elk deaths must be subjected to a post-mortem examination and, if 12 months of age or older, also tested for CWD. Since 1997, MAFRI has not allowed the importation of farmed elk into Manitoba.

CFIA has an eradication policy that requires the destruction of all exposed farmed cervids on infected CWD premises, including any exposed cervid moved from the infected premises within the last 36 months. Cervids that have been off infected premises for more than 36 and less than 60 months are kept under surveillance. The Health of Animals Act provides compensation for animals destroyed and disposal costs.

In addition Manitoba Wildlife Federation and Big Game Trophy Association are supportive of these initiatives and are encouraging their members to send in deer and elk samples.