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General FAQ's

  1. What species are threatened or endangered in Manitoba?
  2. How do I get an eagle feather?
  3. How can I get a songbird identified?
  4. Where do I report a peregrine falcon sighting?
  5. Where do I report a cougar, bobcat, whooping crane, pronghorn or mule deer sighting?
  6. Where can I report dead wildlife found on a road or road allowance?
  7. What do I do if I find dead wildlife on my property?
  8. Who will pick up an injured animal?
  9. How can I keep birds from hitting my window?
  10. How can I prevent raptors from killing or chasing away songbirds?
  11. What do I feed waterfowl during the winter?
  12. What do I feed deer during the winter?
  13. I found a bird with a band on it. Who do I notify?
  14. What do I have to do to get a wild animal mounted by a taxidermist?
  15. What can I do if I have purple loosestrife on my property?
  16. How do I go about donating some of my land for wildlife?
  17. How do I apply for a job with the Wildlife Branch or Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship?
  18. Where do I call to get a Hunter Education Certificate?
  19. Is game farming permitted in Manitoba?
  20. Where can I get more information on wildlife-related diseases such as West Nile Virus, Hantivirus and Lyme Disease?
  21. Where am I allowed to pick or dig wildflowers? Which wildflowers am I allowed to pick or dig?
  22. What do I do if I've come across "orphaned" wildlife?
  23. How do I apply for a hunting guide licence?

1. Q: What species are threatened or endangered in Manitoba?

A: The Endangered Species and Ecosystems Act of Manitoba designates any plant or animal species native to Manitoba that is at risk.

"Endangered" (threatened with imminent extirpation or extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its Manitoba range): Baird's sparrow, burrowing owl, eskimo curlew, loggerhead shrike, peregrine falcon, piping plover, whooping crane, great plains ladies'-tresses, small white lady's-slipper, western prairie fringed orchid, and uncas skipper.

"Threatened" (likely to become endangered or that is particularly at risk because of low or declining numbers in Manitoba): ferruginous hawk, mule deer, boreal woodland caribou, western silvery aster, western spiderwort, Culver's-root, Riddell's goldenrod, ottoe skipper, Dakota skipper and great plains toad.

For a full list of species protected under the Act click here .


2. Q: How do I get an eagle feather?

A: Eagles, eagle feathers and eagle parts are made available to First Nations in Manitoba for traditional ceremonial purposes on a first come, first served basis. The waiting period for a full eagle is currently three years or more due to the high number of applicants on the waiting list and low eagle mortality. Other dead raptors such as hawks and owls that are found and turned in to the department or that are not required for scientific or educational purposes may also be used in this program. A person may apply for such a part or permit by submitting a request for wildlife for traditional use to the Wildlife Branch in Winnipeg by fax at (204)945-3077 or by mail to Box 24, 200 Saulteaux Crescent, Winnipeg MB R3J 3W3.


3. Q: How can I get a songbird identified?

A: Contact the Wildlife Branch at 204-945-5439 or by e-mail.


4. Q: Where do I report a peregrine falcon sighting?

A: All peregrine falcon sightings should be reported to the Peregrine Falcon Recovery Project or you can email Species at Risk directly. Include any information you have such as time, date, location, the bird's condition, whether you could identify a legband or not, etc.


5. Q: Where do I report a cougar, bobcat, whooping crane, pronghorn or mule deer sighting?

A: Contact the Wildlife Branch Species at Risk Biologist Zoologist at 945-5439 or by email: wildlife@gov.mb.ca.


6. Q: Where can I report dead wildlife found on a road or road allowance?

A: Who you contact depends upon the location of the animal. If an animal is found dead on a road or road allowance within City of Winnipeg limits, dial 311 for dead animal pick up. If it's on a highway or highway road allowance, contact the nearest Department of Highways Regional office or call 945-8955. Outside of Winnipeg, please contact your local Rural Municipality office for more information.


7. Q: What do I do if I find dead wildlife on my property?

A:  In most cases it is the responsibility of the land owner to dispose of dead wildlife found on their property. However, because it may be illegal to possess the wildlife without having the lawful authority to do so, property owners should call the nearest Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship District Office for information on how to dispose of dead wildlife found on their property.


8. Q: Who will pick up an injured animal?

A: If you suspect an animal is injured please call The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre at 878-3740 (Ile Des Chenes) or the Prairie Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre at (204)510-1855.


9. Q: How can I keep birds from hitting my window?

A: Unfortunately, many birds cannot distinguish the difference between the real sky and a reflection of the sky in a window. You can minimize these collisions by breaking up the reflection on the outside of the window with a window screen, flash tape and bird netting. 

Life-size, animate "scares" (plastic falcons, owls and balloons) and falcon or owl silhouettes attached to windows with suction cups are only somewhat effective. 

Planting trees and installing window awnings to block the sun from hitting the window may eliminate some reflection. 

Regardless of the season, birds can fly into windows when they're frightened while visiting a feeding station. Either move the feeders a considerable distance away from the window, or immediately adjacent to the window (so birds don't get up to flight speed before hitting the window).


10. Q: How can I prevent raptors from killing or chasing away songbirds?

A: Falcons, hawks and owls (raptors) prey upon insects, birds and mammals. If you feed wild birds or your yard is home to numerous songbirds, expect a visit from a hungry raptor. Although their presence may hinder your bird feeding efforts, consider how fortunate you are to get a close-up look at these magnificent birds of prey.

Place your bird feeders near shrubs or leave brush piles near feeders. This provides the feeder birds with cover, making it more difficult for a raptor to capture them.

Songbirds have evolved with raptors, and if adequate cover (shrubs and trees) is available, most songbirds can avoid raptors.

The Merlin (a crow-sized falcon) regularly nests in urban areas. They typically nest in old crow nests in coniferous trees. If you have large coniferous trees in your neighbourhood, there is a chance you will have a pair of Merlins nesting nearby.

Like robins and chickadees, raptors are protected by law. Provincial law prohibits the capture, killing or possession of hawks and owls, as well as the destruction of their nests and young. 


11. Q: What do I feed waterfowl during the winter?

A: Feeding waterfowl at any time of the year is discouraged, as waterfowl come to rely on handouts and often delay their southward migration. 


12. Q: What do I feed deer during the winter?

A: We recommend that you refrain from feeding deer at any time. Deer become accustomed to being fed at feeding sites and soon lose their fear of humans. They may become dangerous, especially during the rut when male deer are particularly aggressive. Feeding also maintains deer populations at an artificially high level thereby increasing the potential for future property damage.


13. Q: I found a bird with a band on it. Who do I notify?

A: If it is a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Band, contact the Canadian Wildlife Service at 204-983-5259, (Winnipeg) or the Bird Banding Laboratory at 1-800-327-2263. By reporting band numbers you will be helping to manage the continental waterfowl resource. When you contact these offices, you will be asked where and when you encountered the bird.

If the band is not a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service band, the bird is likely a fancy or racing pigeon from a local club.


14. Q: What do I have to do to get a wild animal mounted by a taxidermist?

A: Application for Dead Wild Animal Possession Permit must be completed by the applicant and a Natural Resource Officer, and then forwarded to the Wildlife Branch email: wildlife@gov.mb.ca.


15. Q: What can I do if I have purple loosestrife on my property? 

A: The best time to control purple loosestrife is in late June, July and early August, when it is in flower and plants can be easily recognized. Pull or dig plants from the ground. At sites where plants have gone to seed, remove all of the flowering spikes first by bending them over a plastic bag and cutting them off into the bag. Further cutting of stems or pulling can now take place without fear of spreading the tiny seeds.

Proper disposal of plant material is important. Put all plant pieces in plastic bags (vegetation rots quickly in plastic) and take the bags to a sanitary landfill site. Composting is not advised, as purple loosestrife seeds may not be destroyed and the thick, woody stem and roots take a long time to decompose. Be aware that your clothes and equipment may transport the small seeds to new areas. Thoroughly brush off your clothes and equipment before leaving the site.

DO NOT BUY purple loosestrife or any cultivars from garden centres. Numerous alternatives are available for planting.


16. Q: How do I go about donating some of my land for wildlife?

A: The government of Manitoba accepts donations of lands to be secured under different situations. Contact the Manitoba Habitat Heritage Corporation at 200 - 1555 St. James Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3H 1B5, (telephone 204-784-4350).


17. Q: How do I apply for a job with the Wildlife Branch or Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship?  

A: To apply to this branch or this department, send a current resume to Human Resource Services, 360-1395 Ellice Avenue Winnipeg, MB R3G 3P2 .

All public employment opportunities with the Manitoba Government are online and current. General human resource program information is located on the Civil Service Commission site. Opportunities for students/youths are also available on the youth employment website.


18. Q: Where do I get a Hunters' Safety Certificate?

A: The Manitoba Wildlife Federation administers the Hunter Education Program.  More information can be found on the Manitoba Wildlife Federation website.


19. Q: Is game farming permitted in Manitoba?

A: The commercial farming of wildlife in Manitoba occurs under the authority of The Livestock Industry Diversification Act and is administered by Manitoba Agriculture and Food. Elk is the only species authorized. For more information about this industry, you may contact Manitoba Agriculture and Food, Animal Industry Branch (204) 945-7557. 


20. Q: Where can I get more information on wildlife-related diseases such as West Nile Virus, Hantivirus and Lyme Disease?

A: The Department of Health provides detailed, online information on Hantivirus, West Nile Virus and Lyme Disease. An overview of wildlife-related diseases is also available on this website.


21. Q: Where am I allowed to pick or dig wildflowers? Which wildflowers am I allowed to pick or dig?

A.Please consider leaving plants where they are in the wild, so that others can appreciate them too. Many plants are specially adapted to the areas they grow in.  Do not pick or dig up plants which may have difficulty adapting to a very different new location. A variety of attractive native plants can be obtained for reasonable prices from greenhouses and native plant nurseries. These businesses are able to grow plants from seed, which allows the native plants to stay in the wild.

That said, if a plant is not listed under The Endangered Species Act or is not in a provincial park or provincial forest, a person may pick flowers, collect the seed or relocate plants for personal use. The majority of plant species fall into this last category. Even though there are few legislated restrictions that currently apply to these species, discretion in picking or removal is encouraged and expected. Please read the following guidelines to ensure that your activities do not break any laws, or have a negative impact on the species you wish to collect:

  • Do not pick or dig any plant species listed under The Endangered Species Act. According to the Act, no plant or parts thereof may be killed, injured, possessed or disturbed. This includes the picking of flowers or collecting of seed.
  • Do not pick or dig up any plants in a Provincial Park. It is prohibited under The Provincial Parks Act, with the exception of edible fruits and berries.
  • Do not pick or dig up any plants in an Ecological Reserve. It it prohibited under The Ecological Reserves Act.
  • Do not pick or dig up any plants in a Provincial Forest. Taking, cutting, removing or destroying any flora within a provincial forest is prohibited under The Forest Act without a permit, unless plants are located on a road allowance or a hydro line right-of-way and will be kept for the picker's own use.
  • Do not pick or dig up any plants on private land without the permission of the landowner.
  • Do not pick or dig up plants along the Trans-Canada Highway.
  • Do not pick or dig a plant which appears to be rare in the area. You could contribute to a decline in the species.


22. Q: What do I do if I've come across "orphaned" wildlife?

A:  "Orphaned" Wildlife - Leave them alone!  

Annually, particularly during the spring and early summer, hundreds of young wild animals are unnecessarily picked up by people and turned in to Natural Resource Officers or wildlife rehabilitators for treatment and rearing.

The wild animals most frequently turned in are nestling birds, deer fawns, rabbits and raccoons. While persons picking up these animals are well-meaning, it is important to realize that most of these human-animal encounters are detrimental to the wildlife concerned and can be dangerous to people.

It is normal for many wild animals to leave their young unattended for hours at a time. Deer, for example, leave their fawns for up to eight (8) hours before returning to nurse.

There are many serious health risks associated with handling and living in close proximity with wild animals, including distemper, rabies, parasites and mange. Raccoon roundworm, for example, can cause blindness and death if contracted by people, especially children who have a tendency to put dirt or dirty hands into their mouths.

As well, safety issues are important as wild animals are prone to biting humans and/or attacking household pets.

Unless there is a dead carcass of the mother near the young wild animal, it is best to leave the animal where you found it. A genuinely orphaned animal should be taken to the nearest Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship office or to a permitted wildlife rehabilitator, such as the Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre (878-3740).


23. Q: How do I apply for a hunting guide licence?

A: In order to become a hunting guide in Manitoba you must complete an application form, meet specific qualifications, and pass an examination. More detail, process information and the application form are available on this website.