Livestock and Poultry Housing

Dairy

Dairy producers moving back onto premises that have been flooded should follow normal cleanup and sanitary practices in the barn, milk house and milking parlor (if present). Some points to consider include:

  • Seek advice on how to deal with manure handling systems from a regional agricultural engineer or from your equipment company.  Check all electric motors and pumps for dampness and debris. Be sure they are clean and dry, to avoid any further damage. Check all pressure and vacuum gauges to ensure they are operating properly and accurately.
  • If the vacuum pump shows signs of water immersion, drain oil from the pump, lubricate lines and oil reclaimer. Replace with appropriate grade oil for the pump. 
  • Make certain that all traps and reserve tanks on the milking-machine vacuum system are empty and clear of water and debris before starting them.
  • Check pulsators and timers, if applicable, to ensure proper operation. Be sure to check and clean vacuum controllers (regulators).
  • If an automatic CIP cleaning system is involved check to see that all controls are operating properly before milking. If in doubt, contact the equipment dealer.
  • Check all electronic and computerized systems.
  • Check hydraulics and crowd gates BEFORE loading cows for milking.
  • Scrape and wash collection yards.
  • Remove all organic material, such as debris, manure and straw.  Move it far away from the building for future burning (debris) and spreading (manure).
  • Clean buildings including milk houses, milking parlors and barns before animals return.  Wash with a good general-purpose daily cleaner using high-pressure sprayers or scrub brushes.
  • Milk house and milking parlor floors should be sanitized with a disinfectant that has broad spectrum germicidal action under soil load conditions.  Use the strongest rate suggested by the manufacturer.  Avoid chlorinated disinfectants as they are not effective when organic matter is present.
  • Wash equipment with a chlorinated alkali cleaner.  When using a chlorine or iodine-based sanitizer, take extra care to ensure that dairy equipment is well rinsed before use.
  • Before using any chemical cleaners or disinfectants check the label for information on safe use of the product.  When applying disinfectants of any kind, use disposable coveralls, chemical-resistant gloves and goggles.
  • Clean and disinfect bulk storage bins and other feed equipment.  If flood-waters have entered the bin via the auger ports, remove feed, and clean and disinfect the bin.
  • Test the water supply as soon as possible. Contact your local health unit or dairy inspector for proper sample bottles and instruction.
  • Repair damage which may attract or provide points of entry for rodents.
  • Rodent control should be carried out, in order to minimize the chance of spreading disease organisms carried by rats and mice.
  • More information is available on manure pits, electrical systems and equipment and insulation.

Poultry and Swine

Poultry or swine producers wishing to clean up flooded barns should follow cleaning procedures much like those used between flocks or all-in all-out production.  Some points to consider include:

  • Seek advice on how to deal with manure handling systems from a regional agricultural engineer or from your equipment company.
  • Remove all organic material, such as debris, manure and straw.  Move it far away from the building for future burning (debris) and spreading (manure).
  • Clean and scrub the poultry house or pig barn. Use a high-pressure washer to thoroughly wash all around the interior of the house or barn, including feed production areas.
  • Sanitize with a disinfectant that has broad spectrum germicidal action under soil load conditions.  Use the strongest rate suggested by the manufacturer. Avoid chlorinated disinfectants as they are not effective when organic matter is present.
  • Before using any chemical cleaners or disinfectants check the label for information on safe use of the product.  When applying disinfectants of any kind, use disposable coveralls, chemical-resistant gloves and goggles.
  • Clean and disinfect bulk storage bins, other feed equipment and all other washable equipment. If flood-waters have entered the bin via the auger ports, remove feed, and clean and disinfect the bin.
  • Clean the grounds around the poultry house or pig barn to remove debris and repair damage which may attract or provide points of entry for rodents.
  • Rodent control should be carried out, in order to minimize the chance of spreading disease organisms carried by rats and mice.
  • It is good management practice in normal times to chlorinate water supplies. This is even more desirable after a flood, when bacterial levels in the water supply are likely to be high after being contaminated with flood water. Test drinking water sources for bacterial indicators prior to watering livestock if chlorination is not an option.
  • Thoroughly dry and freshly lubricate all motors and equipment. Consult an electrician or similar professional to determine if it is safe to restore electricity or turn on equipment in your facility.
  • If wall insulation has been exposed to water, it must be dried and replaced before the following winter.
  • More information is available on manure pits, electrical systems and equipment and insulation.

Feedlots

Feedlots should be cleaned by removing silt deposits and a thin layer of topsoil.  Surfaced lots should be scraped down.

For further information please refer to the Office of the Chief Veterinarian contact list