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Wildlife Management Areas

Eastern Region

Catfish Creek 6,451 ha
Northeast of Grand Beach, off PTH 11

The WMA has a diversity of habitats that attract some of the highest concentrations of neo-tropical migrants in North America. The vegetation includes black spruce, tamarack, ash, American elm, Manitoba maple, balsam poplar, birch, white spruce, jack pine, alder, willows, sedges, grasses, and mosses. Both Catfish Creek and Jackfish Creek flow through the WMA into Traverse Bay. Moose, white-tailed deer, black bear, ruffed and sharp-tailed grouse, red fox, coyote, mink, and a variety of waterfowl are found in the WMA at various times of the year. The WMA is within the major breeding and migration corridor for northern forest owls, including the great gray, northern saw-whet, and boreal owls.

Lee River 1,187 ha
East of Lac du Bonnet off PR 520

Ruffed grouse, spruce grouse and the occasional sharp-tailed grouse are found in this WMA, as well as white-tailed deer and moose. Coyotes, wolves and foxes have been known to use the area for denning sites. It is within the major breeding and migration corridor for northern forest owls, including the great gray, northern saw-whet, and boreal owls. Forest songbird species abound because of the mature mixed-wood forests. The WMA is comprised of bedrock outcrops, slightly rolling uplands and bog. The vegetation includes jack pine, spruce, balsam fir and poplar, with willow and a variety of other shrubs interspersed throughout the area.

Mars Hill 3,315 ha
8km east of Libau on PR 317

The WMA is an end-moraine ridge comprised of sand and gravel, with a few bog areas interspersed. The area is dominated by aspen forest and extensive stands of jack pine. White spruce, black spruce, and balsam fir are also found here. Wildflowers grow in profusion in open areas and a few grassland areas with tall-grass prairie species have been identified. The WMA contains an important wintering area for deer, along with the occasional moose and black bear. Ruffed grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, spruce grouse, a variety of raptors, and numerous non-game birds breed and migrate through the area.
Bird watching, hiking, horseback riding, berry-picking and mushroom picking are popular summer activities. A network of snowmobile trails crosses the WMA and cross-country skiers also use the area. The Department of National Defense uses the WMA for survival and winter camping training programs. The Libau Bog Ecological Reserve is adjacent to the WMA along PR 317. Several depleted gravel pits in the WMA have been rehabilitated, while others continue to be mined. 

Thalberg Bush 725 ha
5km east of Thalberg

The WMA is within the major breeding and migration corridor for northern forest owls, including the great gray owl. It is well forested, with aspen forest, spruce and tamarack the most common tree species. Surrounded by agricultural lands, it is important habitat for a variety of neo-tropical migrant birds, grouse, deer, and the occasional bear and moose.