Watchable Wildlife Manitoba

Winnipeg - Urban Wildlife Adventures


If you would like to do a little wildlife watching in Winnipeg, try Fort Whyte Alive, Assiniboine Forest and Park, or the Living Prairie Museum.


Fort Whyte Alive

Services

Availability

Drinking Water Yes
Restrooms Yes
Marked Trails Yes
Boardwalk Yes
Viewing Tower Yes
Picnic Shelter No
Camping No
Concession Yes
Visitor Centre Yes
Interpretive signs/Brochures Yes
Primitive Site No

Description

Fort Whyte Alive is on the southwestern edge of the city and is 260 hectares of reclaimed grasslands, woodlands and lakes, with facilities that model green building techniques. Fort Whyte is a popular spot for spring and fall waterfowl migration. There is a captive bison herd that you can see from the viewing mound. White-tailed deer are plentiful. Floating boardwalks let you get close to Mallards and Wood Ducks. There is also an interpretive centre.

Don’t Miss

  • Bison viewing mound

Habitats

  • Aspen-oak forest
  • Grasslands
  • Lakes
  • Wetland

Site Specialties

  • Captive bison herd
  • White-tailed deer
  • Canada Geese
  • Wood Duck
  • Least Flycatcher

Directions

McGillivray Boulevard to McCreary Road, turn north and watch for the sign on the east side of the road.

Cautionary Notes

Poison ivy can be found at Fort Whyte Alive.

Admission

Entrance fee, call or check Fort Whyte Alive's website for current rates and hours.

More about Fort Whyte Alive

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Assiniboine Forest and Park

Services

Availability

Drinking Water Yes
Restrooms Yes
Marked Trails Yes
Boardwalk No
Viewing Tower Yes
Picnic Shelter Yes
Camping No
Concession Yes
Visitor Centre No
Interpretive signs/Brochures Yes
Primitive Site No

Description

Assiniboine Forest is 280 hectares of aspen-oak forest within the city of Winnipeg, adjacent to Assiniboine Park. The forest is famous for its large population of white-tailed deer. There are two wetlands with viewing mounds. Trails through the forest are popular for walking and biking. See the City of Winnipeg website for maps of the trails. Assiniboine Park is a popular birding spot and home of the Winnipeg Zoo.

Don’t Miss

  • Assiniboine Forest and Park – wetland

Habitats

  • Aspen-oak forest
  • Wetlands

Site Specialties

  • White-tailed deer
  • Wood Duck
  • Ruby-throated Hummingbird
  • Eastern Screech Owl
  • Migrant warblers

Directions

The forest is bisected by Grant Avenue. There is a parking area on the south corner of Chalfont at Grant. The park is on the north side of the forest.

Cautionary Notes

Poison ivy can be found at the Assiniboine Forest.

Admission

No entrance fee, open dawn to dusk.

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Living Prairie Museum

Services

Availability

Drinking Water Yes
Restrooms Yes
Marked Trails Yes
Boardwalk No
Viewing Tower No
Picnic Shelter No
Camping No
Concession No
Visitor Centre Yes
Interpretive signs/Brochures Yes
Primitive Site No

Description

Living Prairie Museum is 12-hectare site that preserves a stand of endangered tall grass prairie on the northwest side of Winnipeg. It gives you a rare opportunity to see some of the native species of this once vast ecosystem. Most people visit to see the native grasses and wildflowers like spring crocus, but you can also see wildlife. Along the walking trail look for prairie birds and butterflies, thirteen-lined ground squirrel, jackrabbit, even a red fox or plains garter snake. The interpretive centre has displays of prairie history and ecology.

Don’t Miss

  • Prairie crocus in spring

Habitats

  • Tall grass prairie

Site Specialties

  • Tall grass prairie plants
  • Western Meadowlark
  • Clay-coloured Sparrows
  • Vesper Sparrows
  • Yellow Warblers
  • Gray Catbirds

Directions

Winnipeg, Manitoba at 2795 Ness Avenue, at the corner of Ness and Prairie View Road, just west of Sturgeon Creek Collegiate. City bus 24 or 25.

Admission

No entrance fee, grounds open dawn to dusk. Call or check the Living Prairie Museum website for interpretive centre hours.

More about Living Prairie Museum

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