• Assiniboine Park: A Walk Through the Stories of the Park Assiniboine Park: A Walk Through the Stories of the Park
  • In the Beginning: In 1904, the land for Assiniboine Park was purchased and the zoo was started. Today, Assiniboine Park is the second largest urban park in North America. In the Beginning: In 1904, the land for Assiniboine Park was purchased and the zoo was started. Today, Assiniboine Park is the second largest urban park in North America.
  • A Period of Rapid Development (1904-1928): The park was designed in the “English Landscape Style”, emphasizing gardens, and curved roads and pathways. The original duck pond was always a popular attraction and was once referred to as “Swan Lake”. A Period of Rapid Development (1904-1928): The park was designed in the “English Landscape Style”, emphasizing gardens, and curved roads and pathways. The original duck pond was always a popular attraction and was once referred to as “Swan Lake”.
  • The formal garden has a very geometric and symmetrical pattern. In contrast, the English Garden has a much more relaxed design. The formal garden has a very geometric and symmetrical pattern. In contrast, the English Garden has a much more relaxed design.
  • The original pavilion, designed by Winnipeg architect J.D. Atchison, was built in 1908. The Conservatory was built in 1914. it provided a year-round tropical environment for growing many exotic plants, trees and flowers. The original pavilion, designed by Winnipeg architect J.D. Atchison, was built in 1908. The Conservatory was built in 1914. it provided a year-round tropical environment for growing many exotic plants, trees and flowers.
  • Tough Times (1929-1950's): On May 27, 1929 a fire burned the pavilion to the ground. A committee was formed to raise funds for a new pavilion which opened on Victoria Day, 1930. The fire was believed to be caused by burglars in the night. Tough Times (1929-1950's): On May 27, 1929 a fire burned the pavilion to the ground. A committee was formed to raise funds for a new pavilion which opened on Victoria Day, 1930. The fire was believed to be caused by burglars in the night.
  • Due to economic troubles, one of the few improvements made to the park from the 1930’s to 1950’s was the construction of the footbridge in 1931. the bridge crosses the Assiniboine River, connecting the park to Portage Avenue. Due to economic troubles, one of the few improvements made to the park from the 1930’s to 1950’s was the construction of the footbridge in 1931. the bridge crosses the Assiniboine River, connecting the park to Portage Avenue.
  • Royal Visit: 15 000 spectators gathered when Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip visited the park on July 24, 1959. They arrived in an open limousine via the footbridge. Royal Visit: 15 000 spectators gathered when Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip visited the park on July 24, 1959. They arrived in an open limousine via the footbridge.
  • During the Queen’s visit to the park, the Hudson’s Bay Company Rent Ceremony was performed. This ceremony involved the Queen being presented with two elk heads and beaver skins as payment for use of the land. During the Queen’s visit to the park, the Hudson’s Bay Company Rent Ceremony was performed. This ceremony involved the Queen being presented with two elk heads and beaver skins as payment for use of the land.
  • Decade of Revitalization (1961-1971): During the 1960's improvements to the park picked up speed once again. The last locomotive to be used in Manitoba, the Canadian National Railway Locomotive No. 6043, was installed in the park in 1962. The miniature steam train was installed in 1964 and quickly became a popular activity for families. Decade of Revitalization (1961-1971): During the 1960's improvements to the park picked up speed once again. The last locomotive to be used in Manitoba, the Canadian National Railway Locomotive No. 6043, was installed in the park in 1962. The miniature steam train was installed in 1964 and quickly became a popular activity for families.
  • As part of the renovations, the zoo gained many new exhibits.  The Mammal House was built in 1964 and the Tropical House was built in 1971. These were both year-round exhibits. As part of the renovations, the zoo gained many new exhibits. The Mammal House was built in 1964 and the Tropical House was built in 1971. These were both year-round exhibits.
  • In 1967 a toboggan slide was built and the duck pond was opened for skating. In 1968 a new conservatory was built. It was done by building over and around the old structure so that the plants could remain protected. In 1967 a toboggan slide was built and the duck pond was opened for skating. In 1968 a new conservatory was built. It was done by building over and around the old structure so that the plants could remain protected.
  • Map of Assiniboine Park in 1967. Map of Assiniboine Park in 1967.
  • Art, Community and Entertainment Flourish in the Park (1990’s - Present): In 1992 a statue of Winnie the bear cub was donated to the park. Winnie was named after Winnipeg and is the inspiration for the popular story of Winnie the Pooh. Art, Community and Entertainment Flourish in the Park (1990’s - Present): In 1992 a statue of Winnie the bear cub was donated to the park. Winnie was named after Winnipeg and is the inspiration for the popular story of Winnie the Pooh.
  • In 1997 much of the pavilion was transformed into an art gallery which features work by Manitoba artists Ivan Eyre, Clarence Tillenius and Walter J. Phillips. In 1997 much of the pavilion was transformed into an art gallery which features work by Manitoba artists Ivan Eyre, Clarence Tillenius and Walter J. Phillips.
  • Leo mol Sculpture Garden: Leo Mol used the “Lost Wax” method to create his famous bronze sculptures which he gifted to the park. The Leo Mol sculpture garden first opened in June 1992 and was completed in 2003 with the addition of several new sculptures. Leo mol Sculpture Garden: Leo Mol used the “Lost Wax” method to create his famous bronze sculptures which he gifted to the park. The Leo Mol sculpture garden first opened in June 1992 and was completed in 2003 with the addition of several new sculptures.
  • Fundraising Events: Various annual charitable fundraisers are held in the park, including walk/run events and the Teddy Bears’ Picnic. Fundraising Events: Various annual charitable fundraisers are held in the park, including walk/run events and the Teddy Bears’ Picnic.
  • Lyric Theatre Stage: Many popular summer events take place at the outdoor Lyric Theatre stage and the surrounding field, including concerts, movies and parties. Lyric Theatre Stage: Many popular summer events take place at the outdoor Lyric Theatre stage and the surrounding field, including concerts, movies and parties.
  • Modern Park Improvements: In 2009 a 10-year, three-phase renovation plan for the park was made public. The plan was first priced at 180 million dollars and has since been increased to 200 million. Modern Park Improvements: In 2009 a 10-year, three-phase renovation plan for the park was made public. The plan was first priced at 180 million dollars and has since been increased to 200 million.
  • Phase One (2010-2011): The first phase involved the expansion of the duck pond, the construction of the Qualico Family Centre and a new nature playground. The Park Cafe within the family centre is consistently listed on the “Best List” in Winnipeg’s culinary magazine, Taste. Phase One (2010-2011): The first phase involved the expansion of the duck pond, the construction of the Qualico Family Centre and a new nature playground. The Park Cafe within the family centre is consistently listed on the “Best List” in Winnipeg’s culinary magazine, Taste.
  • Phase Two (2011-2014): Phase two consisted of developing new exhibits in the zoo. The main new attraction is called Journey to Churchill. It is an award winning northern species exhibit. Phase Two (2011-2014): Phase two consisted of developing new exhibits in the zoo. The main new attraction is called Journey to Churchill. It is an award winning northern species exhibit.
  • Phase Three (Future): The final phase will be the construction of Canada’s Diversity Gardens. It will include outdoor gardens as well as a building known as The Leaf, which will replace the existing conservatory. Phase Three (Future): The final phase will be the construction of Canada’s Diversity Gardens. It will include outdoor gardens as well as a building known as The Leaf, which will replace the existing conservatory.
  • For more information on the Legislative Library materials used in the development of this slideshow please see the links to catalogue records below. For more information on the Legislative Library materials used in the development of this slideshow please see the links to catalogue records below.
     

The following materials were used in the development of this slideshow :

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