The Order of Canada : genesis of an honours system
Cover of
The Order of Canada
enlarge

The Order of Canada : genesis of an honours system / Christopher McCreery, MVO.
Second edition. Toronto : University of Toronto Press, 2017. xxi, 471 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

In 1966, a project to create a national honour for Canadians was begun. The order recognizes individuals for their outstanding achievements, dedication, and service to the country. It is a product of national identity, politics, and history, and includes such individuals as Atom Egoyan, Joseph Boyden, and Louise Arbour.

The second edition of The Order of Canada continues the celebration of the order. Christopher McCreery sheds new light on the development of Canadian honours in the early 1930s, the imposed prohibition on honours from 1946 to 1967, and new details on those who have been removed or resigned from the Order. Extensively illustrated, The Order of Canada pays tribute to the individuals who felt the need for a system of recognition for Canadians. Indeed, the order’s history is as fascinating as the more than four thousand Canadians who have received it.

back to top


Cover of The moral heart of public service
Cover of
The moral heart
of public service
enlarge

The moral heart of public service / edited by Claire Foster-Gilbert, foreword by John Hall, Dean of Westminster, afterword by Stephen Lamport.
London : Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2017. 288 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From Book News:

Drawn from lectures given at Westminster Abbey Institute, this volume brings together 13 essays and dialogues on moral aspects of public service: the good that is public servants' purpose, what it means to serve, the vocation of public service, and the moral dilemmas inherent in public service of all kinds. Theology and public service specialists and politicians from the UK discuss the role of the UK as a moral force in the world; tools for growing moral courage, in relation to moral decisions, moral perception, and moral character development; bringing together people who have hated each other for centuries, with emphasis on the Irish Peace Process; idealism and compromise, including the implications of moral authority and a sense of purpose; the role of the Benedictine community and honesty, peace, and accountability in Parliament Square; the Benedictine virtues of stability, community, and conversion of manners for public service; and the implications of these topics in light of current events like Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union.

back to top


Cover of Aboriginal peoples and the law
Cover of
Aboriginal peoples
and the law
enlarge

Aboriginal peoples and the law / Jim Reynolds.
Vancouver : Purich Press, 2018. xiii, 281 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

As part of the process of healing and reparation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission urged a better understanding of Aboriginal law for all Canadians. This book responds to that call, outlining significant legal developments in straightforward, nontechnical language. James Reynolds provides the historical context needed to understand the relationship between Indigenous peoples and settlers and explains key topics such as sovereignty, treaties, fiduciary duties, the honor of the Crown, Aboriginal rights and title, the duty to consult, Indigenous laws, and international declarations. He concludes that rather than leaving the judiciary to sort out essentially political issues, politicians need to take responsibility for this crucial aspect of building a just society.

back to top


Cover of Thinking government : public administration and politics in Canada
Cover of
Thinking government
enlarge

Thinking government : public administration and politics in Canada / David Johnson.
Fourth edition. North York : University of Toronto Press, 2017. xxiii, 423 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

Thinking Government: Public Administration and Politics in Canada, Fourth Edition introduces students to power relations between elected politicians and unelected public servants, while also covering important topics such as the institutions of the federal government, financial and human resources management, and accountability and responsibility. Johnson explores the ways that the ideological framework of this country shapes what Canadians, their political parties, and their governments think about policy actions and the responsibilities of public servants.

The fourth edition is revised and updated throughout, and addresses the legacy of the Harper government on public administration in Canada. Comprehensive pedagogical supports for students highlight key issues in public administration to help connect theories to the reality of practice.

back to top


Cover of Women who dig : farming, feminism, and the fight to feed the world
Cover of
Women who dig
enlarge

Women who dig : farming, feminism, and the fight to feed the world / Trina Moyles ; photographs by KJ Dakin
Regina : University of Regina Press, 2018. xxvi, 271 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

Review from ForeWord Magazine Reviews:

Farming runs in the family for Trina Moyles: her great-grandmother emigrated from Ireland to Saskatchewan in 1925 and took over the running of the family's farm when her husband and son left to fight in the Second World War. Women's wartime contributions are well known, but today their agricultural achievements are often overlooked, especially in the developing world. Moyles goes a long way toward correcting that deficit with Women Who Dig, a narrative based on stories gathered over three years of travel and interviews with more than 140 women on the front lines of modern food production.

Moyles visits eight locations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. "A woman without land is not a woman," she's told in Uganda, yet that country's amended Marriage and Divorce Bill of 2013, which would have granted property rights to women, was rejected. In Guatemala the elite mestizos hold the power, while the Mam, one of twenty-four indigenous peoples, grow hillside crops just for survival. Meanwhile, the livelihood of women who produce food in Nicaragua is under threat from African palm oil plantations that replace the rain forest.

Closest to home - and most wrenching - is the plight of undocumented laborers in Sonoma County, California's vineyards. These women work for $12 an hour, have no social safety net, and are vulnerable to sexual attack. Moyles is sensitive to such physical dangers and imbalances of power. But she also highlights female farmers' ingenuity, such as Congolese refugees making the most of small spaces and Cuban farmers incorporating permaculture techniques.

Moyles's vibrant travel writing - her arrival in India on the eve of the Diwali festival is a highlight - and K. J. Dakin's color photographs bring these disparate locations to life and ensure that these women farmers' work will be invisible no longer: "They will feed the world. They will remake history."

back to top


The secret life of cows
Cover of
The secret life
of cows
enlarge

The secret life of cows / Rosamund Young.
New York : Penguin Press, 2018. xvi, 139 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

Review from Booklist Reviews:

An organic farmer for more than 30 years, Young runs Kite's Nest Farm on the edge of the Cotswolds in southwestern England. Raising beef and dairy cattle along with sheep, pigs, and chickens in an open environment where the animals choose what's best for them, Young discovered that allowing her animals to express their natural behaviors made sound financial sense. Happy animals grow faster. In a series of interconnected stories, the author writes of bovine friendships, such as that of the White Boys, two pure-white calves born days apart who immediately preferred each other's company to that of their mothers. Animals know how to care for themselves. Those who have sustained an injury will seek out willows, a natural source of aspirin. Lucy the pig taught Young the falsity of the old wives' tale that pigs couldn't swim by jumping into a pond and doing a few laps. Young's animal stories are truly charming and quietly convincing of the great value of a more natural form of farming.

back to top


 Cover of On the frontier : letters from the Canadian West in the 1880s
Cover of
On the frontier
enlarge

On the frontier : letters from the Canadian West in the 1880s / William Wallace ; edited by Ken S. Coates and Bill Morrison.
Regina : University of Regina Press, 2015. xxxii, 311 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

First published more than twenty years ago as My Dear Maggie, this new edition of William Wallace's letters home to England provides rare documentation of the earliest days of settlement in the West. The correspondence conveys a sense of unspoken courage--the courage that was needed to make a fresh start in a strange new land.

"William's letters contains many elements common to settlers' writings: a recounting of the exhausting trip behind slow-moving oxen from the jumping-off point to the homestead, the violence of thunderstorms, the pain of frozen extremities, and the destruction caused by prairie fires. They are also full of the fine details of life not usually found in such abundance in pioneer narratives, details made vivid by William's observant eye and lyrical writing style... He tells of mosquitoes (he even encloses one in a letter)... the fierce weather, nearby bears and howling wolves. William Wallace takes us on his personal journey from immigrant to citizen, a journey awakened by his growing attachment to his new landscape."

back to top


Price paid : the fight for First Nations survival
Cover of
Price paid
enlarge

Price paid : the fight for First Nations survival / Bev Sellars ; foreword and excerpts by Hemas Kla-Lee-Lee-Kla (Hereditary Chief Bill Wilson).
Vancouver : Talonbooks, 2016. xxvii, 209 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

Price Paid untangles truth from some of the myths about First Nations and addresses misconceptions still widely believed today.

The second book by award-winning author Bev Sellars, Price Paid is based on a popular presentation Sellars often told to treaty-makers, politicians, policymakers, and educators.

The book begins with glimpses of foods, medicines, and cultural practices North America’s indigenous peoples have contributed to the rest of the world. It documents the dark period of regulation by racist laws during the twentieth century, and then discusses new emergence in the twenty-first century into a re-establishment of Indigenous land and resource rights. The result is a candidly told personal take on the history of Aboriginal rights in Canada and Canadian history told from a First Nations point of view.

back to top


Off the street : legalizing  drugs
Cover of
Off the street
enlarge

Off the street : legalizing drugs / W.A. Bogart ; foreword by Sukanya Pillay.
Toronto : A.J. Patrick Boyer Book, 2016. 278 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

From the publisher:

An unflinching analysis of one of the major issues of our time - the shift from criminalization to regulation of recreational drugs.

The “war on drugs” has failed. The cost of trying to control the production, sale, and use of recreational drugs through the criminal law is too high: unjust incarceration, illicit markets, tainted substances, exploited children, and an untaxed industry.

But there is an alternative.

The watchwords for governments controlling the consumption of alcohol, tobacco, junk food, and gambling are “permit but discourage.” All are legal, but harmful consumption is decreased by targeted regulatory strategies.

That same approach should be adopted for drugs. Legalization and regulation can attack the underground economy, drive down excessive use, provide revenue for prevention, treatment, and counselling, and better protect children.

Off the Street: Legalizing Drugs calls for a thoughtful, national discussion of the legalization and regulation of recreational drugs - the “least bad” way forward.

back to top


Political tribes : group  instinct and the fate of nations
Cover of
Political tribes
enlarge

Political tribes : group instinct and the fate of nations / Amy Chua.
New York, New York : Penguin Press, 2018. 293 pages.

Find this book in our catalogue

Review from Kirkus Reviews:

In a biting critique of American foreign policy and analysis of the nation's divisive culture wars, Chua argues that tribal affiliation exerts a crucial, powerful force on individuals' behaviors and identities. Humans' need for "bonds and attachments," she asserts, fulfills an instinct to belong but also to exclude. People "will sacrifice, and even kill and die, for their groups." Reprising some ideas from her book World on Fire (2002) on the negative consequences of exporting free market democracy, Chua examines America's failed involvement in Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Venezuela as well as responses to terrorist groups. The author blames blindness to tribalism for the disastrous outcomes. That blindness comes, in part, from America's unique success in assimilating diverse populations into its "ethnicity-transcending national identity." Assessing other countries, Americans have failed to recognize tribal affiliations and rivalries or the existence of a repressive "market-dominant minority" that controls major sectors of the economy. Instead, the U.S. has fixated on its mission to foil communism and export democracy. Focused on the Cold War, "U.S. foreign policy in Afghanistan never saw the potent anti-American, anti-Western group identity fueling the Islamic fundamentalist fighters." In Iraq, foreign policy was shaped by a belief in "markets and democracy as a universal prescription for the many ills of underdevelopment." In reality, the downfall of Saddam Hussein incited rivalries among tribal groups and the rise of ethnic conflict and fundamentalism. In Trump's America, cohesion has splintered "into ever more specific subgroups created by overlapping racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientation categories" that feel threatened by one another. Inclusivity, hailed by the left, has devolved into exclusivity as groups seek to exert "exclusive rights to their own histories, symbols, and traditions." Nevertheless, Chua is heartened by individuals' efforts to bridge divides and to undermine "purveyors of political tribalism" on the left and right. A persuasive call to rethink foreign policy and heal domestic fissures.


back to top