Peace Bonds

What is a peace bond?

A peace bond is a type of court order of protection under Section 810 of the Criminal Code that sets conditions on an individual (defendant) who appears likely to commit a criminal offence against another person. Peace bonds can order a wider range of conditions on a person than other types of protective orders.

Who can get a peace bond?

Any person who fears that another person may injure them, their spouse or partner, their child, or their property may obtain a peace bond.

People who fear that another individual is in possession of their intimate image, and may share it without consent can also apply for a peace bond. If you think this situation may apply to you, click here learn more about options for victims of Non-Consensual Distribution of Intimate Images.

How long is a peace bond valid for, and can it be enforced outside of Manitoba?

A peace bond is valid for up to one year. If the defendant still appears likely to commit a criminal offence after one year, the peace bond can be renewed by application to the court. Peace bonds can be enforced anywhere in Canada.

What happens if a defendant disobeys a peace bond?

Breaching any condition of a peace bond is a criminal offence. A conviction carries a maximum sentence of up to four years imprisonment. The defendant may also be required to forfeit any cash surety they were required to pay, or have promised to pay the Court, as a condition of the peace bond.

Do I need help from the police to apply for a peace bond?

No. Any person can apply to the court to obtain a peace bond. You may choose to consult a lawyer for help with the application. Applicants also need to serve the defendant with a summons, and will have to testify in court.

However, if you choose to get help from the police, they will investigate your concerns and, if they agree with your concerns, will draft a peace bond on your behalf and ask if the defendant is willing to sign it. If not, then the police will file the application and present evidence to the court. You may still have to testify, but if you have safety concerns, the police may be able to make alternate arrangements.