Tick-Borne Diseases


Do you know what can be lurking in wooded and grassy areas? Infected blacklegged ticks. They can spread the bacteria that cause Lyme disease, a potentially serious illness. Here's what you need to know about it.

Watch this video from Government of Canada: Enjoy the Outdoors, Without a Tick

Blacklegged tick [Photo courtesy of CDC Atlanta Public Health Image Library]Tick-borne diseases are the result of an infection by disease-causing agents such as viruses, parasites and bacteria that can be contracted through the bite of an infected tick. In Manitoba, there are several species of ticks but only one species, Ixodes scapularis, is responsible for spreading tick-borne diseases to humans. This tick is more commonly known as the deer tick or the blacklegged tick. Other tick species, such as the more common wood tick, are not effective vectors of disease causing agents in Manitoba.  

There are three reportable tick-borne diseases found in Manitoba: Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis and Lyme Disease. Anyone who feels that they may have contracted a tick-borne disease should see a doctor. Tick-borne diseases can be successfully treated and treatment is most successful in the early stages of infection. In addition to the three reportable tick-borne diseases, Manitoba Health (Health) also monitors tick populations for the introduction of other disease causing agents such as Borrelia miyamotoi and Powassan virus. 


Reported Cases of Anaplasmosis in Manitoba

In 2015 Anaplasmosis became a provincially reportable disease in Manitoba.

Case Classification
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
Total
Confirmed Case *
1
1
4
14
6
11
2
39
Probable Case *
0
0
2
7
4
5
2
20
Total Reported **
1
1
6
21
10
16
4
59

As of April 27, 2022

* At present Anaplasmosis is not reportable nationally and surveillance case definitions reflect those developed by Health.
** Some reported cases are currently under investigation; these cases will be classified when the investigations are complete.   


Reported Cases of Babesiosis in Manitoba

In 2015, Babesiosis became a provincially reportable disease in Manitoba.

Case Classification
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
Total
Confirmed Case *
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
Probable Case *
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
Total Reported **
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
2

As of April 27, 2022

* At present Babesiosis is not reportable nationally and surveillance case definitions reflect those developed by Health.
** Some reported cases are currently under investigation; these cases will be classified when the investigations are complete.


Reported Cases of Lyme Disease in Manitoba

In 2009, Lyme disease became nationally reportable. National definitions for confirmed and probable cases were developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), whereby Canadian jurisdictions will consistently report both confirmed and probable cases.


Classification des cas
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
Total 2017-2021
Total 2009-2021
Confirmed Case *
19
15
34
29
34
131
235
Probable Case *
19
15
34
25
13
106
203
Other **
11
11
22
17
14
75
141
Total Reported ***
49
41
90
71
61
312
579

As of June 17, 2022

* Confirmed and probable cases of Lyme disease became reportable to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) in 2009.  Manitoba has adopted the national surveillance case definitions for reporting. National case definitions are available at: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/lyme-disease/surveillance-lyme-disease/case-definition.html

** Cases listed as “Other” include those that have been reported to Health either by a physician or lab report, but do not meet the national surveillance case definitions for a confirmed or probable case of Lyme disease.

*** Some reported cases are currently under investigation; these cases will be classified when the investigations are complete.

Communicable Disease Control (CDC)
Public Health
Manitoba Health

4th Floor - 300 Carlton St.
Winnipeg MB  R3B 3M9  CANADA

Health Links – Info Santé
204-788-8200 or 1-888-315-9257

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