Wild Animals of Manitoba

Manitoba is home to a rich and diverse variety of wildlife species. The Wildlife Act and The Endangered Species Act designate a number of those species as "wild animals" in the province to further protect and maintain sustainable populations of wildlife.

These two provincial acts do not include all wild animals indigenous to Manitoba. For example, migratory birds (such as ducks, geese, herons) are listed under the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act and Environment and Climate Change Canada should be contacted for more information.

Manitoba Sustainable Development endeavours to assist people with wildlife-related problems where possible. For some species, such as skunks, raccoons, woodchucks, etc, the landowner or property owner may have to address the problem themselves.

Human – Wildlife Conflict

Fur bearing animals, and some big game species such as black bear and wolves, may be taken by property owners in defence of property without either a trapping or hunting licence (Section 46 of The Wildlife Act).

This authorization applies to the land owners only on their own land where the conflict arises. On other private property or on Crown lands, a special permit is first required.

Any animals taken under the provisions of Section 46 must be reported within 10 days to the nearest Manitoba Conservation and Water Stewardship office. The pelts may not be sold unless under permit. All black bear taken must be surrendered to the department.

Predator Management

The Problem Predator Management Program is administered and delivered under agreement with the Manitoba Trappers Association (MTA) to remove problem predators (coyote, fox and wolf ). In 2014, MTA trappers responded to 34 Manitoba Agriculture Services Corporation (MASC) claims and removed 63 coyote, 3 fox and 27 wolf that were responsible for killing livestock. These claims represent the lowest take-up of the program since its inception in 2007-2008 and the fewest number of problem predators removed under it. Some difficulty was experienced this year with the availability of qualified trappers to assist with the program. As a consequence, some MASC claims could not be addressed.

MASC predator claims shows the Bifrost, Grahamdale and Vassar areas to be chronic wolf depredation areas while St. Pierre-Jolys, Boissevain and Souris are chronic coyote depredation areas.

Summary Problem Predator Removal Services Program

Year

Requests for Service

Foxes

Coyotes

Wolves

Total Predators

2007-08

78

21

178

30

229

2008-09

89

17

300

55

372

2009-10

81

12

320

43

375

2010-11

73

11

352

33

396

2011-12

58

0

147

14

161

2012-13

37

3

119

11

133

2013-14

45

8

166

41

215

2014-15 34 5 89 29 123