Psychosis

What is Psychosis?

Psychosis is a condition that affects the mind – where there has been some loss of contact with reality. Psychosis can be associated with a number of medical conditions including schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder and addiction. Psychosis can happen to anyone. Early detection and effective treatment can promote a full recovery.

What are some signs of psychosis?

Social

  • Dropping out of activities
  • Suspiciousness/paranoia
  • Social withdrawal

Thinking and Speech

  • Hallucinations (seeing, hearing or feeling things that are not really there)
  • Irrational statements
  • Peculiar use of words, odd language structures

Emotional

  • Inability to cry or feel joy
  • Feelings of depression and anxiety
  • Emotions not in keeping with situation or thought

Behaviour

  • Deterioration of personal hygiene
  • Excessive writing without meaning
  • Severe sleep disturbance

Personality

  • Shift in basic personality
  • Reckless behaviours – out of character
  • Prolonged decrease in motivation

What can I do to help (or get help)?

  • See a medical professional.
  • Get the facts. Learn more about psychosis.
  • Visit your local community health centre. For community health centres in your region, contact your local Regional Health Authority.

If you are having an immediate mental health crisis, please click here to see a listing of mental health crisis lines and services available in Manitoba.


Schizophrenia

What is Schizophrenia?

Schizophrenia is a disturbance of the brain's functioning. It can seriously disturb the way people think, feel and relate to others. About one person in 100 develops schizophrenia. Men and women are affected equally; however, men tend to have their first episode of schizophrenia in their late teens or early 20s. With women, the onset is usually a few years later. In most cases, the illness can start so gradually that people will begin to have symptoms, but they and their families may not be aware of the illness for a long time. In some cases, the onset is rapid.

Schizophrenia has three phases and these phases tend to occur in order and appear in cycles throughout the course of the illness. The symptoms of schizophrenia fall into two categories: “positive” symptoms and “negative” symptoms. Positive symptoms (e.g. delusions, hallucinations, disorganized mood) refer to symptoms that appear due to the illness. Negative symptoms (e.g. slowing of physical activity levels, reduced motivation) refer to the elements that are taken away from a person.

It is impossible to predict how well a person with schizophrenia will recover; however, some people will recover almost totally.

What can I do to help (or get help)?

  • See a medical professional.
  • Get the facts. Learn more about Schizophrenia.
  • Visit your local community health centre. For community health centre in your region, contact your local Regional Health Authority.

If you are having an immediate mental health crisis, please click here to see a listing of mental health crisis lines and services available in Manitoba.


Sources & Resources:

  • Canadian Mental Health Association Manitoba. (2000, Mar). Youth and Psychosis. Retrieved Mar 26, 2012.
  • Canadian Mental Health Association Manitoba. Schizophrenia. Retrieved Mar 26, 2012.
  • Canadian Psychiatric Research Foundation. (2004, Oct). When Something`s Wrong: Ideas for Families - Schizophrenia. Retrieved Mar 26, 2012, from Healthy Minds Canada.

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