Visit this blog for regular posts about Your Archives: The Histories We Share throughout 2020. Visit the Archives of Manitoba to see the records in person.

Recent Posts:

December 4, 2020

Records related to Deaf Education in Manitoba — Submitted by David Burke, researcher of Deaf Education in Manitoba and member of the Deaf community

“I have been interested in the history of Deaf Education in Manitoba for many years. I started researching more seriously about seven years ago, after I retired. I have found a lot of useful information at both the Archives of Manitoba and the Legislative Library.

“The first Deaf school was established in Winnipeg in 1888 in the Fortune Block at Main Street and St. Mary Ave. In the 132 years since then, deaf students in Manitoba have moved 13 times!

“There are many records related to the many Manitoba School for the Deaf buildings at the Archives including photographs and plans. It is difficult to pick just one record! I am choosing a photograph of the old Manitoba Agricultural College in Tuxedo which was the Manitoba School for the Deaf from 1914 to 1917, during the First World War.

“During the time that the deaf students were at the Tuxedo campus, the buildings and grounds were also used for military training and barracks. This made for an interesting experience for the students. Some male students wrote in the school’s newsletter, The Echo, in the December 1, 1914 issue 1:

‘We are delighted to hear that the soldiers are going to live in the Machinery and Dairy Buildings here. We hope they will drill in front of Roblin Hall every afternoon.

‘There are soldiers up at the school. They live in the Machinery and Dairy Buildings. We do not go near them. Dr. McDermid told us to stay away from them for we might get shot by the sentries. There will be no hockey in the Amphitheatre this year, because the soldiers are living there.’

“In 1914-1915 there were 83 deaf students at the Manitoba School for the Deaf and in 1915-1916 there were 108 students. They lived at the school from September to June and did not go home for holidays during the school year.

“The Archives has many photographs of the old Manitoba Agricultural College. I have chosen this panoramic photo which shows the buildings used by the Deaf School and some of the soldiers who were there during the First World War. These are the men of the 27th Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The photo was taken in January 1915. The light-coloured building in the centre housed the students. The building on the left, Roblin Hall, housed the soldiers.

“If you zoom in, you can see the soldiers’ guns. It is incredible to see the guns and think that the deaf students wouldn’t even hear them being fired!

(portion of above photo)
enlarge image

full size
(portion of above photo)

“The Archives also has a photo of the Tuxedo campus which clearly shows all of the buildings and the outdoor space which was used for drilling. The deaf students were told not to go out to this area which was south of the school but they could go north of the buildings towards the Assiniboine River. They liked to skate and play hockey on the river in the winter.

“In 1917 the military took over the whole Tuxedo campus to use as a hospital for returning soldiers. The students wrote in The Echo in the April 2, 1917 issue:

‘Over 100 are working here on the buildings for the soldiers. The Boy’s Building is ready. Yesterday we saw many women come. They scrubbed and cleaned the building. Some men have worked there at night this week. Wounded soldiers are coming there next Monday.’

“This meant that the deaf students had to move once again. The 1916-1917 school year ended abruptly and the school moved to the new Agricultural College in St. Vital (now the University of Manitoba in Fort Garry) for the 1917-1918 school year. They shared space with the university students there for a number of years until a purpose-built school opened in 1922 on Shaftesbury Boulevard. There are so many interesting stories in the history of Deaf Education in Manitoba.”

Written with Rachel Mills, an archivist at the Archives of Manitoba who has assisted David with his research and learned a lot about the history of Deaf Education in Manitoba from him.


References:
  1. ^ Issues of The Echo are held by the Legislative Library of Manitoba.


Want to know more? Search Keystone for more information.

Want to participate in Your Archives? See Submit Your Story for details. You may e-mail us at yourarchives@gov.mb.ca with a comment about this blog post and your comments may be included on this page.


back to top

November 27, 2020

Watercolour painting of Fort Dunvegan by Rollin Price Meade — Submitted by Thomas Schultze, author of Hudson’s Bay Company Posts and Depots: Images from a Vanished Era

“Significance - The image is the only artistic rendition of the establishment [Fort Dunvegan] at HBC Archives. Its circular shape is unusual for a landscape painting. Its diameter of only 14 cm contains a great deal of minute detail.

“Description - Most prominent are the snow-covered hills and their deeply incised valleys and slanted snowdrifts, to the left of the gully, and to its right, the two frozen waterfalls. This surreal-looking hillside hovers above the small settlement, separated from it by rows of trees.

“The fort’s buildings form the standard layout, with a central courtyard open to the river. On the north side the artist shows a major dwelling facing the entrance, the post manager’s residence. The two large subdivided structures along each side are men’s and officer’s dwellings and storage facilities for provisions and agricultural products. Note absence of palisades and bastions.

“The level area between fort and river is blown in with snow, the snow banks repeating the pattern on the hill. One York boat is pulled up on the bank and several canoes can be seen further up. Off to the right can be seen the horse pasture and fields and to the left, an oxcart.

“In the foreground, left, we see an adult person with a child and in the centre, a man leading a draft animal and sleigh. One person carries water to the fort, drawn from a hole in the river ice, while some dogs wait to drink. Other figures can be seen approaching the fort from the riverbank.

Brickyard
enlarge image

full size
Watercolour of Fort Dunvegan by Rollin Price Meade
Hudson’s Bay Company Archives, Archives of Manitoba, Fort Dunvegan [Peace River, AB], Watercolour by Rollin Price Meade, ca. 1866, HBCA P-178

“Artist - Rollin Price Meade (1837-1879) was an artist, adventurer, newspaper editor and house painter. In the service of the Hudson's Bay Company, he spent some time in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Meade painted the first canvas curtain at the historic Walker Theatre in Winnipeg. In 1869, at the time of Louis Riel's Rebellion in Manitoba, he was an artist and the editor of the ‘Nor' Wester’ Newspaper.”

Want to know more? Contact us for more information.

Want to participate in Your Archives? See Submit Your Story for details. You may e-mail us at yourarchives@gov.mb.ca with a comment about this blog post and your comments may be included on this page.


back to top

November 20, 2020

Records of 4-H Clubs — Submission by Alfred Chorney, amateur historian, Brokenhead Heritage Committee

“An earlier inquiry to Archives requesting Records of 4-H Clubs in Brokenhead/Beausejour Ag Rep District, yielded a response indicating that there is an abundance of records of club activities in the area. Our intent was to visit Archives to view the details of files. Members of our committee could not make arrangements to date.

“The prime reason for choosing the content of the 4-H files is to identify the Clubs that have been part of the rural youth education programs that were provided through the Manitoba Departments of Agriculture since 1917 – earliest identified Club – through to approximately 1980. The impact of 4-H activities in the district was substantial.”

Brickyard
enlarge image

full size
Boys’ and Girls’ Clubs handbook, organizers’ edition, 1917
Archives of Manitoba, Manitoba 4-H Council fonds, Brochures – Historical, 1917, P6098/7
Brickyard
enlarge image

full size
Programme for the Eighth Annual Trip to Manitoba Agricultural College for Manitoba Swine Clubs, 1928
Archives of Manitoba, Manitoba 4-H Council fonds, Brochures/Pamphlets/Programs – Historical, Swine/Pig Clubs, 1928, P6099/8

“Depending on the outcome of the search of the files and our ability to compile historical data along with artifacts, photos etc. acquired from other sources, it would be proposed that a ‘history of 4-H in North-Eastern Manitoba'’ would become part of the Broken-Beau Historical Society's Pioneer Village Museum located in Beausejour.”

Want to know more? Contact us for more information.

Want to participate in Your Archives? See Submit Your Story for details. You may e-mail us at yourarchives@gov.mb.ca with a comment about this blog post and your comments may be included on this page.


back to top

November 13, 2020

Records related to brick and limestone — Submission by Peter Schuster, Director, MMI (Manitoba Masonry Institute)

“I would like to nominate the simple, yet beautiful building blocks of brick and limestone that helped build the foundations and buildings that our great city is renowned and celebrated for today. Built by skilled local craftsmen and artisans who have passed down their craft and know how, for generations. These same crafts are taught and celebrated in our post secondary institutions to this modern time. These simple materials were skillfully brought together to create housing, offices, warehouses and factories that helped move our society forward through prosperous and sometime turbulent times. All standing the test of longevity with beauty, grace and function. These many buildings tell us a historical story that can be seen and related to by Manitobans to this very day. They continue to functionally adorn even new buildings constructed, with a modern look that help to link us back to our historical roots.

Brickyard
enlarge image

full size
Archives of Manitoba, L.B. Foote fonds, Foote 1972. Brickyard, ca. 1913, P7401/3


“This is a great choice to help celebrate our 150th anniversary. It not only celebrates the foresight of our leaders, but celebrates the countless many working families of architects, engineers, construction workers and masons who worked diligently together to contribute to a collection of historical and significant buildings and artifacts that permeate our great city to this very day. Going back in time, these were trades learned in other countries and brought by the immigrants, many of whom CHOSE to make Manitoba home. This was all done with many materials that were either made locally, by long forgotten brick manufacturers that dotted the city, but were also quarried locally within the province, some still in operation today. Many of these building stand the test of time and are now treasured and protected for generations to come. Not only do these building give us a unique character for the city and province to celebrate, many are also adorned with unique and historical advertising that remind us to this day of an era not to be forgotten. These materials, made from the abundance of resources located within our great province, have themselves a story to tell within the shapes and patterns of the fossilized remains that helped create them. There are many layers to this story that go well beyond the simple sides of the keystone of our province.

“There are an abundance of examples throughout our province, from the legislative buildings, to almost all buildings in the warehouse district, schools, courthouses and most other buildings that help make a city or province function on a daily basis. Examples can be found in almost any archived photo showing the landscape and fabric of all cities and towns located within our great province. This is a story that can be shared, told and related to by all towns, cities and most importantly Manitobans.”

Bank of Hamilton Building, Main Street
enlarge image

full size
Bank of Hamilton Building, Main Street
Archives of Manitoba, Winnipeg – Buildings – Business – Hamilton Building 1, 1957
Construction of the Legislative Building
enlarge image

full size
Construction of the Legislative Building
Archives of Manitoba, L.B. Foote fonds, Foote 607. Construction of Leg. Building showing N. side of east of S. wing, 19 October 1915, P7395/1
Lenore and Eagleton Schools, ca. 1909-1912
enlarge image

full size
Lenore and Eagleton Schools, ca. 1909-1912
Archives of Manitoba, A 0278 Department of Education photograph album, GR2664, page 69, G 11005


Want to know more? Search Keystone for more information. View more photographs of the construction of the Legislative Building in our online exhibit, The Manitoba Legislative Building: Photographing a Work in Progress.

Want to participate in Your Archives? See Submit Your Story for details. You may e-mail us at yourarchives@gov.mb.ca with a comment about this blog post and your comments may be included on this page.


back to top

November 6, 2020

First World War letter written by Lt. Alexander Logan Waugh to his father — Submission by Alexander Waugh, nephew of Lt. Alexander Logan Waugh, grandson of Winnipeg Mayor R.D. Waugh and great-grandson of Mayor Alexander Logan

“His sentiments bespeak a country and Empire united to defend against the Kaiser. He didn't see himself as any special hero but felt for his men and thousands of others for the sacrifices they and their families made to keep Canada and Manitoba free.”

Letter from Alexander Waugh to his father, France, 17 November 1917
enlarge image

full size
Letter from Alexander Waugh to his father, France, 17 November 1917
enlarge image

full size
“Letter from Alexander Waugh to his father, France, 17 November 1917”
Archives of Manitoba, Waugh family fonds, Letters from Alexander Logan Waugh to his family, July November 1917, P7965/11


Want to know more? Search Keystone for more information. You can read more about this letter in our previous blog, At Home and Away: Remembering the First World War through records at the Archives of Manitoba. A scrapbook kept by the Waugh family was also featured in our blog.

Want to participate in Your Archives? See Submit Your Story for details. You may e-mail us at yourarchives@gov.mb.ca with a comment about this blog post and your comments may be included on this page.


back to top