Provincial Condemnation Rates

 
 
Reasons for whole and partial carcass condemnations and their associated rates are monitored by the Chief Veterinary Office (CVO)/Animal Health and Welfare Branch and the Food Safety and Inspection (FSI) Branch.

Whole Carcass Condemnations
Partial Carcass Condemnations


Manitoba's Meat Hygiene Inspection Program, at the province's abattoirs, contributes to the surveillance of key food safety, animal health and animal welfare issues in provincial livestock and poultry populations.

All animals and carcasses at provincially permitted abattoirs are inspected. All reasons a live animal, whole carcass or parts of a carcass are considered unfit for human consumption are recorded. Whole carcasses are condemned when the entire product (carcass and all contents) is deemed unfit for human consumption. Carcasses can be partially condemned when specific body parts are deemed unfit for human consumption and removed, however, the remaining carcass (and its contents) is still safe for human consumption. The rate of these condemnations for the main species involved are also recorded.

The Animal Health and Welfare Branch analyzes the records on a quarterly basis to determine the most common reasons for condemnation and whether significant changes in the number and types of condemnations have occurred. Data is shared with key stakeholders, including abattoirs, producers and veterinarians and used to develop programs that target important issues.

Reasons for whole and partial carcass condemnations are outlined in the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) Disposition Manual for Red Meat Species. This manual is used by all federal and provincial Manitoba meat hygiene inspectors.
 
 

Whole Carcass Condemnations

  
Table 1 The top five reasons for whole carcass condemnations for swine, chicken and cattle slaughtered in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Manitoba in a rolling 12-month average from October 2021 to September 2022.

1 Enteritis (proctitis) differs from enteritis in hogs as it originated from a rectal prolapse resulting in secondary enteritis.
2 Enteritis differs from enteritis (proctitis) in hogs as it is the sole condition with no secondary complications.
3 Subcutaneous conditions in chickens include cellulitis and sternal bursitis.
4 Others conditions in chickens include cannibalism, odour, pericarditis, peritonitis and toxemia.
5 Liver conditions in chickens include hepatitis, cholangiohepatitis, hepatosis, necrotic hepatitis, icterus and jaundice.


Table 2 The top five reasons for whole carcass condemnations for swine, chicken and cattle slaughtered in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Manitoba for the current quarter from July to September 2022.

1 Enteritis (proctitis) differs from enteritis in hogs as it originated from a rectal prolapse resulting in secondary enteritis.
2 Subcutaneous conditions in chickens include cellulitis and sternal bursitis.
3 Others conditions in chickens include cannibalism, odour, pericarditis, peritonitis and toxemia.
4 Skin conditions in chickens include avian kerato-acanthoma and dermatitis.

 

  Partial Carcass Condemnations
 
 Table 3 Partial carcass condemnations greater than 1% for swine and cattle slaughtered in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Manitoba in a rolling 12-month average from October 2021 to September 2022.

1 Miscellaneous conditions in cattle & swine include necrosis (unknown cause) and other unknown conditions.

 
 Table 4 Partial carcass condemnations greater than 1% for swine and cattle slaughtered in provincially-inspected abattoirs in Manitoba for the current quarter from July to September 2022.

1 Miscellaneous conditions in cattle & swine include necrosis (unknown cause) and other unknown conditions.

   

Contact

For more information, please contact the Chief Veterinary Office or call 204-945-7663 in Winnipeg.